Fincantieri Marks Milestone Event for Trio of Princess Ships

Princess Ceremony at Fincantieri

Fincantieri and Princess Cruises today celebrated three construction milestones of three Royal-class ships, currently in different construction phases, at a ceremony at the Monfalcone shipyard.

The day began with the live broadcast of the steel cutting for the sixth and last Royal-class ship, still unnamed, at the shipyard of Castellammare di Stabia (Naples).

Princess Ceremony at Fincantieri

The section, once completed, will be transported by sea to the yard in Monfalcone, where the ship will be completed in 2022.

Later, in Monfalcone, the keel laying of Enchanted Princess, the fifth Royal-class ship, was marked, with a delivery date in 2020.

Princess Ceremony at Fincantieri

The event was attended by Jan Swartz, Princess Cruises and Carnival Australia group president, and Luigi Matarazzo, senior executive vice president of the merchant ships business unit of Fincantieri.

In addition, the Sky Princess was floated out, and will join the fleet later this year; the Madrina of this ceremony was Kerry Ann Wright, a second officer with Princess.

In addition, Fincantieri will build two next-generation 4,300-guest ships for Princess Cruises with delivery dates in 2023 and 2025. The ships will be 175,000 tons each.

Advertisements

Ports of Auckland Challenged on Shore Power Plan

The Carnival Spirit is based year-round in Australia (photo: Clyde Dickens)

Ports of Auckland (POAL) has announced that it has decided to adopt the recommendation of a recent study to plan for shore power, which it said will have an estimated cost of some $18.3 million and the potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 31 percent.

Commenting on POAL’s decision, however, CLIA Australasia’s managing director Joel Katz stated that a key strategy of the major cruise lines in meeting the IMO requirements is the adoption of exhaust gas cleaning system technology to achieve emission reductions. But, with the advancements in cleaner fuels and emissions abatement systems, he said, the usefulness of shore power will likely decline over time, and it should not be assumed that the next generation of cruise ships will be designed and built as shore power enabled, he said.

Katz added that it was worth noting that the Ports of Auckland said it will carry out further work on shore power, including a detailed cost estimate, a cost-benefit analysis and an investigation of funding options so there is still a lot discussion to be had with industry.

According to the POAL, cruise ships were selected for the study as the cruise industry has been proactive at addressing environmental issues over the past decade and these vessels are more frequently fitted with the onboard infrastructure required. This, combined with high individual electricity demand while at berth (compared to other vessel types), is expected to increase utilization and deliver the highest emission reduction return.

The study looked at the feasibility of a wide range of emission reduction technologies, including shore power (grid supplied, local generation including renewables, hybrid); fuel switching (methanol, LNG, low sulfur diesel); land/barge based exhaust capture systems; and ship based scrubbers.

Viable solutions were assessed against a range of social and environmental attributes in addition to the whole of life cost. This holistic approach was adopted to provide a balanced assessment of the alternatives, with consideration of the stakeholder values.

The report recommended two options: To implement shore power at one cruise berth in the next five years; and/or fuel switching to 0.1% sulfur fuel.

The report or the recommendation did not address the issue, however, that very few of the ships currently sailing year-round or seasonally from Australia are equipped to plug in.

The Carnival Spirit and Legend, for example, are not shore power enabled, according to Carnival Australia.

Fincantieri delivers China-bound Majestic Princess

Fincantieri delivers China-bound <i>Majestic Princess</i>

Princess Cruises’ first China-market cruise ship Majestic Princess has been delivered by Fincantieri (credit: Fincantieri/Princess Cruises)
 

Carnival Corp and Princess Cruises have taken delivery of Majestic Princess – their first international luxury cruise ship tailored for the Chinese market.

The official handover took place at the ship’s builder Fincantieri’s shipyard in Monfalcone, Italy.

“Majestic Princess has arrived and we are thrilled to add this new jewel to our crown representing the newest, most stylish and most luxurious flagship to our fleet,” said Jan Swartz, Princess Cruises and Carnival Australia group president. “We are ready to deliver an exceptional international cruise vacation experience to our guests.”

“Fincantieri proudly delivers Majestic Princess today to our long-term partner, Princess Cruises,” said Fincantieri chief executive officer Giuseppe Bono. “The collaboration between Fincantieri, Carnival Corporation & plc and Princess Cruises to tailor Majestic Princess for China makes her special for us. We are proud to deliver this stunningly beautiful luxury cruise liner and highly value the partnership we have with Princess Cruises dating back to the 1980s. We will continue to deliver increasingly sophisticated ships in the future that serve the needs of our partners and their treasured guests.”

Majestic Princess will start its inaugural season in Europe until May and then embark on a repositioning cruise themed the Silk Road Sea Route journey to its new homeport in Shanghai where it will begin its first homeport season in July.