Cruise Lines Make More Hurricane Adjustments

Navigator of the Seas

The three major cruise lines announced more itinerary changes due to Hurricane Dorian following Thursday’s itinerary change news, and more adjustments are expected to follow on Friday as the storm develops.

Carnival

The Carnival Paradise will now leave Tampa early on August 31, with Carnival asking guests to arrive at the cruise terminal between 10:00 AM – 1:00 PM.

For the Carnival Miracle, with the anticipation of a potential port closure on Sunday, this sailing will now operate as an eight-day sailing, departing on Saturday evening.

Royal Caribbean

Royal Caribbean has modified more sailings as a result of the impact of Hurricane Dorian.

Guests aboard the Navigator’s August 30 sailing are now returning to Miami on Sept. 4 as opposed to Sept. 2, meaning the ship’s Sept. 2 sailing will leave two days later.

The Empress will see guests get multiple days added to the itinerary. Unable to return to Miami this Sunday, the cruise now will add a call to Roatan, spend two days at sea, call in Nassau and then return to Miami on Sept. 4.

The Mariner will also get two days added to its current itinerary, returning to Port Canaveral on Sept. 4 as opposed to Sept. 2.

Norwegian

The Norwegian Breakaway will extend its port time in Cozumel until Sept. 1, giving guests a chance to disembark and return home or remain onboard if they choose.  Guests who choose to end their cruise in Cozumel will receive a 25% future cruise credit.

The  Norwegian Sun departed from Port Canaveral, Florida Thursday, August 29, 2019, as scheduled. The calls to Nassau, Great Stirrup Cay and Freeport, Bahamas have been cancelled. Instead, the ship will spend a day at sea on Friday, August 30 and will call to Cozumel, Mexico on August 31. She will remain at sea on September 1 and is scheduled to return to Port Canaveral on September 2.

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Carnival Cruise Line to sail in Med in 2020

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Carnival Cruise Line is returning to Europe in 2020 with revamped ship Carnival Radiance.

The vessel will sail in the Mediterranean from Barcelona from April 29, 2020, following a $200 million refit in dry dock in Cadiz.

Carnival Radiance will run a ten-day itinerary followed by nine-and 12-day departures visiting destinations throughout the region, including Italy, France, Croatia, Greece, Malta and Spain.

The ship will then embark on a 13-day transatlantic crossing from Barcelona on June 11 to 24, to be in place for an inaugural season in New York, including the first Cuba cruises from the city.

The ship will also offer four five- to seven-day voyages from Norfolk, Virginia, in October and November 2020, also including calls into Cuba.

Carnival Radiance will reposition to Port Canaveral in Florida to sail a winter schedule of six- to eight-day cruises to the Caribbean and Cuba from November 8, 2020.

Carnival Radiance and Carnival Sunrise will each undergo extensive refits in 2019 and 2020 respectively to add new food, drink and entertainment options, including aqua parks and an open-air recreation complex.

The new-look Carnival Sunrise will operate a series of long weekend cruises from New York to Bermuda as well as longer Caribbean voyages and calls into Cuba from May 21, 2020.

The line also has three new ships due for delivery – the 133,500-ton Carnival Panorama set to enter service in 2019 and two as-yet-unnamed 180,000-ton ships in 2020 and 2022.

MSC Cruises chief warns yields could drop amid mass growth

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MSC Seaview

Cruise line yields could fall in the future due to the volume of new ships entering the market in the next decade, according to the boss of MSC Cruises.

A total of 106 ships are expected to launch between 2017-26, including 12 alone from MSC Cruises. Other mainstream cruise brands such as Royal Caribbean International has six ships on its order books and Norwegian Cruise Line has seven. 48 expedition and luxury ships are also planned.

Asked whether occupancy levels were at risk of falling from so much growth, chief executive Gianni Onorato told delegates at the ITT Conference in Sicily: “No, we are not crazy. But in difficult times it can have an impact on yields more than occupancy. So I think this will be more of an issue than occupancy levels.”

Onorato said the slowdown in cruise bookings last year in the UK was due to a “lack of capacity” in 2017 and said he was very “optimistic” about the British market going forward.

He said the biggest challenge facing cruise lines was future proofing ships which are built to last 20 years.

“Knowing what guests want in 2040 when you’re building them now is very difficult to predict so we need to have a flexible mindset and be able to follow guests’ needs (in terms of technology) but at the same time maintain human contact,” Onorato said.