Tianjin Targeting 800,000 Passengers in 2017

The Ovation of the Seas in Tianjin

With four berths, Tianjin expects around 800,000 passengers this year, and through the first six months of 2017, traffic was up some 102.4 percent.

Customs and border protection has been further refined, reducing clearance times to 10 seconds in some instances with automated terminals.

Earlier this year, the port signed a MOU with Costa to build a supply and distribution center, with Costa committing to year-round voyages from Tianjin through 2019.

Also of note, the MSC Lirica sailed from Tianjin in February, offering a new “Around China” itinerary with interporting in Zhoushan, Hong Kong and Xiamen, as well as calls to South Korea and Japan, according to Da Wu, vice general manager of Tianjin International Cruise Terminal.

Wu hopes his port will offer more diversified products, including cruises to nowhere, to attract new passengers

Zhengdong Zhang, general manager, added: “Similar to MSC’s model, we are exploring opening domestic routes to Dalian, Yantai, Qingdao, Rongcheng and Weihai, creating a product in which passengers only need their national identification card to travel.”

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Carnival Corp: On Track to Slowly Remove Older Ships

Adonia in her Fathom livery during a 2016 turnaround day in Miami
Adona (Fathom) is set to join Azamara Cruise.

Carnival Corporation remains on pace to remove one to two older, less efficient ships from its fleet on an annual basis following two recent transactions.

Carnival announced earlier in the week the P&O Adonia has been sold to Azamara for a March 2018 delivery. The Adonia joins the neoClassica, which will leave the Costa fleet around the same time.

Newer ships are not only generally larger, but burn less fuel and generate higher ticket pricing and onboard revenue.

The 2001-built Adonia is one of the smallest ships in the Carnival fleet, at 684 passengers. The neoClassica is also on the smaller side, with capacity for 1,308 passengers, having been built in 1991.

The sales are part of the company’s broader corporate strategy to remove older, less efficient ships, while moderating capacity growth in line with demand, according to executives.

“We remain on track with our strategically enhancement program as we continue to deliver more efficient vessels, while replacing less efficient ones over time,” said Arnold Donald, president and CEO of Carnival Corporation, on the company’s third quarter earnings call.

Last year followed a similar beat as the 1988-built Pacific Pearl left the P&O Australia fleet for a new home with Cruise & Maritime Voyages. Her capacity was replaced by the much newer 1997-built Dawn Princess, which was transferred to P&O Australia and renamed the Pacific Explorer.

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“As demonstrated by our April sale of Pacific Pearl, as well as our recently announced sale of Costa neoClassica, expected to leave the fleet next April, and our P&O Adonia, expected to leave the fleet next March. We remain on pace with our historical average of removing one to two ships per year,” Donald added.

In 2014, the company moved a number of ships off its books as the Voyager, which was operating for Costa was sold to Bohai Ferry.The Celebration went to Bahamas Paradise after her stint with Iberocruceros. The Grand Holiday, another Ibero ship, was sold to Cruise & Maritime Voyages, and finally, the Ocean Princess was sold to Oceania, a deal in which Carnival even provided financing.

Costa hires food-waste consultant

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Costa Dolorosa
 Costa Cruises has partnered with Winnow, a London company that reduces food waste for hospitality companies.

The Costa Diadema is already serving as a lab for process improvements that will be implemented on all Costa ships in Europe and Asia.

On its website, Winnow said the hospitality sector wastes 600,000 tons of food per year compared to the retail sector (including supermarkets), which wastes 400,000 tons. Winnow said that on sites where it has worked for over six months, it has reduced food waste (by value) by an average of 65%, and that savings break even with Winnow’s fees in the second month of operations.

“Tackling food waste is a huge opportunity for the sector, and with the right tools can be transformative for the entire cruise line industry,” Winnow CEO and co-founder Marc Zornes said.