Genting Hong Kong Reports 2017; Outlines Future Strategy

Double Star Call

Genting Hong Kong has reported a segment loss of $186 million on revenues of $1.1 billion for its cruise operations for the year ended Dec. 31, 2017, compared a loss of $106 million on revenues of $908 million for the previous year. Genting owns and operates Dream Cruises, Crystal Cruises and Star Cruises.

Overall Genting posted a loss of $244 million on revenues of $1.2 billion for 2017, compared a to a loss of $504 million on revenues of $1.0 billion for 2016. This includes profit or loss contributions from its shipyards and joint ventures.

For its cruise operations, Genting said in its year-end report that passenger ticket revenue and onboard revenue increased significantly in 2017 mainly to the full year’s service of the Genting Dream and the Crystal Mozart, as well as the launch of the World Dream. Crystal Bach and Crystal Mahler during the year.

Depreciation of the new Dream and Crystal vessels and start-up costs for the new Crystal river ships resulted in the segment loss, according to Genting.

Shipyard operations also posted a segment loss.

For 2017, passenger ticket revenue was $728.3 million or $197.26 per passenger cruise day. Onboard spending was $287.7 million or $77.92 per passenger day.

For 2016, the passenger ticket revenue was $625.4 million or $213.99 per passenger cruise day. Onboard spending was $96.73.

With Dream and Star operating in Asia, Genting stated that Asia generated approximately 68 percent of its cruise revenues in 2017, 30.4 percent came from Europe and 1.6 percent from “other.” In 2016, Asia generated 56.2 percent of the revenues, Europe 42.3 percent and 1.5 percent came from “other.”

While Dream Cruises improved its occupancies and yields in the Hong Kong/Guangzhou and Singapore markets, the arrival of new ships was said to have had a negative impact on Star, creating downward pressure on occupancies and yields. This situation is expected to improve, however, as other brands are reducing their capacity in the market.

Crystal is also seeing more competition with competing brands launching new ships, according to Genting.

Overall, the three brands had a 77.2 percent occupancy in 2017, compared to 81.7 percent in 2016.

The two-ship Dream Cruises fleet, which launched service with the first ship in 2016, will see two more global-class ships join in 2020 and 2021. Plans call for them to sail from Shanghai and Tianjin during the summer months and Australia, New Zealand, California and the ASEAN region during the winter months. The brand is being tagged as “Asia’s Global Cruise Line” by Genting, which also said it will have the youngest fleet in the world.

Star Cruises will continue to sail from China, Taiwan, Malaysia.

Crystal Cruises two ocean-going ships are being extensively renovated. The river fleet will grow to five vessels in 2018, and the yacht expedition segment will grow from one to two ships, with the introduction of Crystal Endeavor in 2020. Furthermore, Genting said that a new class of ocean ships are being designed for Crystal’s fleet to provide more itineraries and reach better economies of scale.

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Cruise cools to China

Image result for china cruises

By Tom Stieghorst
The cruise industry’s gold rush to China, if not over, has entered a new phase: For the first time in at least four years, cruise capacity in China will not grow in 2018.

That means that the focus and management attention that has been lavished on the world’s most populous country may now be turning elsewhere.

To hear evidence of that, listen to the list of places that Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings CEO Frank Del Rio reeled off when asked if he’s ready to put the second ship in China.

“We have many other either unserved or underserved markets that we would also consider in the mix, should ships become available to us,” Del Rio said in response to a question from a Wells Fargo analyst. “We don’t have a presence in the mid-Atlantic states. We’re not in Baltimore. We’re not in Charleston. We don’t have a presence at all in the world’s second-largest port, which is Fort Lauderdale. We don’t have a presence in the Gulf States of Texas or Alabama. We don’t have a year-round presence in Tampa or New Orleans or in Los Angeles.”

Del Rio went on to say that the Norwegian Cruise Line brand will have three ships in Alaska this summer, where some competitors have as many as eight.

“So, given our fleet size today and the fact that we will only be taking one ship per year, it could be a couple of years before we consider adding more tonnage to China, if the conditions in the rest of the world remain as robust as they are today,” Del Rio said.

The Chinese boom really got going in 2014 when Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd. announced it would devote its brand-new Quantum of the Seas, the first of a new class of ship, to the Chinese market.

In a world full of supposedly bold moves, that one really was. And it prompted other lines for the first time to put brand new ships in China, as everyone feared being left behind in the scramble to impress the Chinese.

Being the preferred brand in a market that was projected to be the biggest in the world in a decade or so was worth the gamble of putting brand new tonnage in an unproven and opaque market.

So when Princess Cruises sent the Majestic Princess to Shanghai last year and Norwegian sent the Norwegian Joy, in addition to the Quantum and ships from Costa Cruises and others, the result was a crowded field.

Throw into the mix the spat between China and South Korea that limited itineraries out of northern China, and China became a much weaker cruise market last year.

While cruise lines insist that they’re in it for the long haul, and even in the short term it has been profitable, the sense that China is going to deliver a big increase in global cruise revenues has been tempered.

Already Norwegian’s focus for 2018 has turned to introducing Norwegian Bliss to the North American market, and in particular the U.S. West Coast. Who knows where else in the U.S. Norwegian ships might be coming next?

World Dream to Debut in China in November

World Dream
Genting World Dream sistership to the Genting Dream

Genting Cruise Lines is set to launch World Dream, the newest ship for Dream Cruises, this November at her dual homeports in Hong Kong and Guangzhou (Nansha) to continue to grow the Pearl River Delta cruise industry and provide fly/cruise options for the region with new itineraries to Vietnam and the Philippines.

Genting said in a prepared statement that the World Dream has been conceived as a floating high-end, integrated resort at sea leveraging on the parent company Genting Hong Kong’s core expertise in both land and sea based businesses. The debut of World Dream will further enhance the brand’s capacity to offer a broad spectrum of multi-generational programs and facilities for guests, highlighted by Asian hospitality and a market leading crew-to-guest ratio.

“Genting Cruise Lines is reinforcing our position in the Pearl River Delta Region by welcoming the World Dream to begin her service with dual homeports in Guangzhou (Nansha) and Hong Kong, following in the footsteps of the Genting Dream,” said Kent Zhu, president of Genting Cruise Lines. “Designed to cater to the growing Chinese market with tailor-made facilities, including quad occupancy staterooms to accommodate families, the World Dream will further build upon our ongoing commitment to this region, which has seen Guangzhou (Nansha) evolve into China’s second busiest port and the strengthening of Hong Kong as a premier fly/cruise hub.”

Six-day/five-night cruises will call at Manila and Boracay in the Philippines from Nov. 17 through March 31, alternating with same length sailings to Ho Chi Minh and Nha Trang in Vietnam from Dec. 3 to October 2018, targeting both local and international guests.

The twin sister ship the Genting Dream, meanwhile, will be deployed at her new homeport in Singapore with new itineraries to North Bali and Surabaya in Indonesia, as well as Kuala Lumpur and Penang in Malaysia and Phuket in Thailand.

“By doubling Dream Cruises Fleet with the addition of World Dream, we are delighted to be offering our guests and valued travel partners diverse itineraries featuring new, authentic destination experiences,” commented Thatcher Brown, President of Dream Cruises.