Viking Sky suffered engine failure and rescue helicopters are evacuating people


Viking Sun’s position on AIS Ship @18:25 today

A cruise ship with 1,300 passengers on board has sent out a mayday call after suffering an engine failure in heavy winds near Norway.

The ship, named Viking Sky, was drifting towards land when it let out the distress signal.

Helicopters have been evacuating people from the vessel amid high waves and strong winds.

It was later able to restart one engine, was anchored just over a mile from land and is no longer adrift.

Image result for viking sun

Viking Sky issued a mayday call after suffering engine failure in high winds off the coast of Norway

The ship battled heavy winds and high waves in Hustadvika, an area of the Norwegian coastline known to be dangerous

The ship battled heavy winds and high waves in Hustadvika, an area of the Norwegian coastline known to be dangerous

Up to 90 passengers have been hoisted up one by one from the deck of the vessel and airlifted to a village located just north of the town of Molde on Norway’s west coast. 

One woman messaged family to let them know she had to be stretchered off the ship after heavy waves battered the ship and left her ‘submerged underwater’. 

The passenger said: ‘A wave smashed a door open right behind us and we were submerged under water.

‘We thought that was it and my knee has been damaged.

‘I’ve been stretchered off which was just as scary.’ 

One passenger messaged family to let them know she had to be stretchered off the ship after heavy waves battered the ship and left her ‘submerged under water’

And rough seas have forced two rescue ships to turn back as even tugboats are not sure they will be able to reach the stricken cruise liner.

The stretch, named Hustadvika, is known as one of the most dangerous sections of the Norwegian coast with many shipwrecks in the region.

A spokesperson said: ‘If we need to evacuate everyone, it will take a long time.’

The ship, built in 2017, belongs to Viking Ocean Cruises founded by Norwegian billionaire Torstein Hagen. 

According to the company website, its passenger capacity is 930.

Several boats and four helicopters took part in the rescue and facilities to receive passengers have been set up on land.

But only 10 to 15 people can be taken per flight on emergency helicopters sent to airlift passengers to safety.  

It is thought there are currently still more than 885 passengers on board. 

The wind was blowing at a speed of 38 knots, police told Norwegian newspaper VG.

All search and rescue teams in the region are mobilising, including 60 volunteers from the Norwegian Red Cross, a spokesman said.

Viking’s operational headquarters, located in Basel, Switzerland, did not respond when contacted by telephone.

Advertisements

Celebrating Christmas in Norway on Hurtigruten’s Finnmarken

Finnmarken

Finnmarken is one of Hurtigruten’s 11 ships that sail year-round along the Norwegian coast, round trip 12 days from Bergen to Kirkenes, making some 65 port calls ranging from 15 minutes to more than four hours.

Finnmarken

Finnmarken

The 2002-built, 15,690-ton Finnmarken can accommodate up to 740 passengers in staterooms and another 250-day passengers, as well as cargo and up to 47 cars.

Finnmarken

The current Christmas cruise includes large contingents of passengers from India and China in addition to passengers from South Africa, Australia, the UK, Germany and the United States.

Finnmarken

Winter attractions include Norway’s nature, including the Northern Lights, and shore excursions ranging from sightseeing to dog sledging, cross-country skiing and mountain hiking.

Finnmarken

The culinary experience is focused around Hurtigruten’s Coastal Kitchen concept, featuring ingredients and dishes native to Norway.

Northern Lights

(Photos by Angela Reale Mathisen and Oivind Mathisen)

Norway Expected to Step Up Fjord Emissions and Discharge Restrictions Sooner

 

Geiranger

While Norwegian authorities have previously announced that they will introduce zero emissions restrictions in their heritage fjords by 2025, the Norwegian Maritime Authority (NMA) is expected to introduce restrictions starting already next year (2019) and gradually step up the requirements.

In its publication, Navigare, the NMA states that its restrictions will cover air emissions as well as grey-and blackwater and scrubber water in the Geirangerfjord, Nærøyfjord and Aurlandsfjord.

It is currently legal to sail in the Geirangefjord with HFO without exhaust gas cleaning systems as the fjord is north of the North Sea Emission Control Area. The other two fjords are within the ECA.

The NMA will require exhaust gas cleaning systems or low-sulfur fuels such as MGO.

Another proposal, which is said to be circulating for review in Norway, is a speed restriction for all ships above 20,000 tons, which will result in reduced fuel consumption and reduced emissions.

The NMA is also proposing that ships of more than 2,500 tons and carrying more than 100 persons will not be allowed to discharge grey- or Blackwater or scrubber water in the fjords. Visible smoke emissions must meet transparency requirements.

The Navigare article states that the number of ships visiting these fjords in the future is expected to go down and that the oldest ships are expected to leave first.