NCLH: Hurricane Relief Underway; Breakaway to Deliver Key Supplies

Norwegian Breakaway

Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings today announced the relaunch of Hope Starts Here, the company’s hurricane relief campaign in partnership with All Hands and Hearts, and pledged a minimum commitment of $1 million toward immediate short-term relief for those affected by Hurricane Dorian, according to a prepared statement.

The company has also vowed to match donations dollar-for-dollar to assist with rebuilding efforts across the Bahamas, including debris cleanup and removal, and the delivery of supplies and temporary shelters.

“Our hearts are heavy after witnessing the impact and devastation caused by Hurricane Dorian across the Bahamas,” said Frank Del Rio, president and chief executive officer of Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings. “We have been cruising to these islands for over 50 years and remain committed to its wonderful people during this unprecedented event. Through our partnership with All Hands and Hearts, we vow to match all donations collected to support the country’s rebuilding efforts.”

Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings is also coordinating with local Bahamian authorities to bring needed provisions to the affected areas, as quickly and as humanly possible. On Sept. 5, Norwegian Breakaway will depart Miami with hurricane relief supplies donated by Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings and its employees, in addition to items collected by the City of Miami, Baptist Health South Florida, the 305 Gives Back foundation, and other Miami-based organizations, to be delivered to Nassau, Great Harbor Cay, the company’s private island Great Stirrup Cay, Bahamas.

“We are pleased and humbled to again partner with Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings, to bring both immediate and long-term support to those who have so tragically suffered from Hurricane Dorian in the Bahamas,” said Erik Dyson, chief executive officer of All Hands and Hearts. “We partnered, after Hurricanes Irma and Maria, to help respond to and rebuild communities in Key West, St. Thomas, Tortola, Puerto Rico, and Dominica – this resulted in helping literally tens of thousands of people moving forward on their path to recovery. We look forward to continuing this joint impact working with and for the people of the Bahamas.”

The cruise industry view of Trump’s order to leave China

Image result for royal caribbean in china

With President Trump “ordering” U.S. companies via Twitter to leave China, and suggesting they return home, one wonders what would happen if he turned his attention to the cruise firms headquartered in Miami.

Could he “order” them to bring their Shanghai-based ships back to U.S. waters? Or to stop building their $1 billion ships in Europe?

Of course, the first obstacle is that none of these companies are legally incorporated in the U.S. But set that aside for a minute. They’re certainly American companies in other respects.

Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings CEO Frank Del Rio appears to have beaten Trump to the punch by ordering home the Norwegian Joy to sail in Alaska this summer alongside its doppelganger, the Norwegian Bliss.

Of course, Del Rio acted for business reasons and not out of any animosity towards China or need to chastise Chinese leader Xi Jinping for raising tariffs.

If Royal Caribbean International or Princess Cruises did pull their ships from China, they would probably be rewarded on Wall Street, which has a much easier time analyzing profits in the short term than investments for the long haul, which the China market needs.

But the cruise ship example shows how perverse the strategy of “finding an alternative to China” can be for many industries. Calling home the ships in the China market doesn’t mean they would sail from Seattle to San Diego full of happy Americans.

In fact, American law would prohibit them from being used that way. The ships would go back into the international mix of itineraries that have some ships departing from Miami and New York, but others from Barcelona and Southampton.

The kingly notion of imposing tariffs and directing private business decisions from the throne was losing viability when economist Adam Smith attacked it in the 18th century. It may have some political appeal but in economic terms, the world has passed it by.

For the same reason, building big cruise ships in America – no matter the cost – makes no particular sense either.

As many companies manufacturing in China are finding out, the key in the 21st century to making things reliably and at market prices is an intelligent and at least somewhat skilled workforce and a robust network of proven contractors that can accommodate just in time delivery.

That’s what the European shipyards that make cruise ships have. And by operating within the framework of the European Union they can bring to bear a workforce that while not as large as China’s is larger than the U.S’s.

Yes, China may be cheating on some of the economic terms and conditions that make free trade a win-win proposition. But going back to the idea that each country should manufacture everything on its own makes about as much sense as booking your next cruise on the Nina, the Pinta or the Santa Maria.

Norwegian Encore Floats Out

Norwegian Encore

The new Norwegian Encore has left the building hall in Germany and is now at Meyer Werft’s outfitting dock ahead of an October delivery.

Norwegian Encore

Following her delivery, the 4,200-guest ship will cross to New York for preview events, before ending up in her winter homeport of Miami in late November.

Norwegian Encore

A representation of his modern and abstract style, the ship’s hull features a “labyrinth of color” inspired by Arranz-Bravo’s life by the sea in Barcelona and pays tribute to the vibrant guest experience for which the Norwegian brand is recognized, according to company statements.

Encore Float Out

After her debut in Miami, the Encore will move to Seattle in 2021, sailing seven-day cruises to Alaska.

Encore Float Out

Also new will be a partnership with LDV Hospitality to bring the Scarpetta concept to the Norwegian Encore with Onda by Scarpetta. The new restaurant is the first of its kind and will join the Scarpetta portfolio’s locations in New York, the Hamptons, N.Y., Miami, Las Vegas, Philadelphia, Newport, R.I., and London.

Encore Float Out

The name Scarpetta is derived from the Italian expression, ‘fare la Scarpetta,’ which means to savor a meal to the last bite, according to a statement.