Princess Cruises ship to feature in a TV documentary

Image result for Crown Princess

Princess Cruises’ 3,080-passenger ship Crown Princess will appear on a behind-the-scenes TV documentary next month.

The hour-long episode called Monster Ships follows the vessel as it sails a 10-day Caribbean voyage from Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

Viewers will see the jobs carried out by 1,200 crew members working in the 17 restaurants and bars onboard, providing round-the-clock room service across more than 1,500 cabins and entertaining guests.

Monster Ships was commissioned by Discovery Networks International and made by WAG TV, an international producer of TV shows.

Tony Roberts, vice president Princess Cruises UK and Europe, said: “We’re delighted to see Princess Cruises once again feature on the small screen, this time providing viewers with a rare onboard glimpse behind-the-scenes.

“The Crown Princess episode of Monster Ships is recommended viewing for anyone with an interest in the incredible mechanics and logistics of a cruise ship, or who wants to see the premium guest experience we offer on one of our stunning Caribbean sailings.”

Viewers can also experience the ship for themselves when it sails out of the UK next year on a series of voyages to the Mediterranean and northern Europe.

The episode will air on UKTV’s Yesterday Channel on Thursday, October 3 at 8pm.

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The cruise industry view of Trump’s order to leave China

Image result for royal caribbean in china

With President Trump “ordering” U.S. companies via Twitter to leave China, and suggesting they return home, one wonders what would happen if he turned his attention to the cruise firms headquartered in Miami.

Could he “order” them to bring their Shanghai-based ships back to U.S. waters? Or to stop building their $1 billion ships in Europe?

Of course, the first obstacle is that none of these companies are legally incorporated in the U.S. But set that aside for a minute. They’re certainly American companies in other respects.

Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings CEO Frank Del Rio appears to have beaten Trump to the punch by ordering home the Norwegian Joy to sail in Alaska this summer alongside its doppelganger, the Norwegian Bliss.

Of course, Del Rio acted for business reasons and not out of any animosity towards China or need to chastise Chinese leader Xi Jinping for raising tariffs.

If Royal Caribbean International or Princess Cruises did pull their ships from China, they would probably be rewarded on Wall Street, which has a much easier time analyzing profits in the short term than investments for the long haul, which the China market needs.

But the cruise ship example shows how perverse the strategy of “finding an alternative to China” can be for many industries. Calling home the ships in the China market doesn’t mean they would sail from Seattle to San Diego full of happy Americans.

In fact, American law would prohibit them from being used that way. The ships would go back into the international mix of itineraries that have some ships departing from Miami and New York, but others from Barcelona and Southampton.

The kingly notion of imposing tariffs and directing private business decisions from the throne was losing viability when economist Adam Smith attacked it in the 18th century. It may have some political appeal but in economic terms, the world has passed it by.

For the same reason, building big cruise ships in America – no matter the cost – makes no particular sense either.

As many companies manufacturing in China are finding out, the key in the 21st century to making things reliably and at market prices is an intelligent and at least somewhat skilled workforce and a robust network of proven contractors that can accommodate just in time delivery.

That’s what the European shipyards that make cruise ships have. And by operating within the framework of the European Union they can bring to bear a workforce that while not as large as China’s is larger than the U.S’s.

Yes, China may be cheating on some of the economic terms and conditions that make free trade a win-win proposition. But going back to the idea that each country should manufacture everything on its own makes about as much sense as booking your next cruise on the Nina, the Pinta or the Santa Maria.

Princess and Fincantieri Sign Contracts For Two Ships

Sky Princess at Fincantieri

Princess Cruises and Fincantieri announced today the signing of the final contracts for the construction of two next-generation LNG-fueled 175,000-ton cruise ships, which will be the largest ships ever built so far in Italy, with deliveries scheduled in Monfalcone in late 2023 and in spring 2025.

This announcement follows the initial signing of a memorandum of agreement between the two parties in July 2018.

The vessels will each accommodate approximately 4,300 guests and will be based on next-generation platform design, being the first Princess Cruises ships to be dual-fuel powered primarily by LNG, Princess said.

“Princess Cruises continues to grow globally — adding new ships to our fleet built by our long-time trusted shipbuilding partner, Fincantieri, who brings decades of expertise to these next-generation cruise ships,” said Jan Swartz, Princess Cruises President. “Even more exciting is that these two ships are being designed to include our MedallionClass platform, powered by OceanMedallion, the most advanced wearable device available within the global hospitality industry.”

Giuseppe Bono, CEO of Fincantieri, commented on the announcement: “This result proves, once again, the trust we receive from the market, which allows us to look to the future with ambition. It honours our great work focused on innovation thanks to which we have been able to offer to the client a record-breaking proposal not only in terms of size. Besides, we firmly believe that a new class of Princess Cruises’ ships, one of Carnival Group’s top brands, can stem from this promising project. In fact, for Princess Cruises, we have received orders for 21 ships, another unprecedented result in this industry.”