Carnival Horizon a ‘Vista Sista’ but with notable differences

The outdoor serving station at Guy’s Pig & Anchor Smokehouse/Brewhouse. Photo Credit: Tom StieghorstONBOARD THE CARNIVAL HORIZON — Before this ship got its official name, Carnival Cruise Line president Christine Duffy liked to joke that it would be called the Vista Sista.

The two ships are truly as similar as siblings, with just a few wrinkles separating the 2016-delivered Carnival Vista from 2018’s Horizon.

One of the most noticeable differences can be discerned as soon as guests board the 133,500-gross-ton Horizon, however. The Horizon is the first Carnival ship to be equipped with “destination-based” elevators.

The Funship Towel Animal mascot strolling the decks. Photo Credit: Tom Stieghorst
The Funship Towel Animal mascot strolling the decks. Photo Credit: Tom Stieghorst

The system, which was initially intended for the Vista, puts all the elevator floor commands on a touchscreen in the waiting area, rather than having them clustered on a panel inside the elevator itself.

Passengers punch in their destination, and a software program assigns them the next elevator that is headed to their destination floor. The idea is to cut down on wait times.

For anyone who hasn’t encountered the system on land previously, it takes a day or two to get comfortable with not having the traditional buttons to push inside the car. The walls next to the elevator doors look oddly empty, and one is left to trust that the system really will deliver you to the desired destination.

Many of the features introduced on the Vista have been faithfully reproduced on the Horizon without any variation, including the Imax theatre, the Family Harbor Lounge and the amazing Dreamscape columns that anchor the main atrium and the casino bar.

Up top, the nifty SkyRide recumbent bikes suspended from their dual tracks circle the funnel just like on the Vista.

At first glance, the Havana Cabana section seems like another duplicate, but the warren of tropically themed suites has been enlarged, giving it 79 cabins, 18 more than on the Vista.

On the top deck, the WaterWorks children’s water park has been festively rebranded with Dr. Seuss themes, with Seuss characters prowling the premises. Kids can choose between the red-and-white Cat in the Hat slide or the blue Fun Things slide. There’s also a 300-gallon Cat in the Hat tipping bucket.

Stairs to the water slides at the Dr. Seuss WaterWorks. Photo Credit: Tom Stieghorst
Stairs to the water slides at the Dr. Seuss WaterWorks. Photo Credit: Tom Stieghorst

In the atrium, Carnival has added new retail names such as Michael Kors, Hublot and Kate Spade. But the biggest addition for the Horizon is Victoria’s Secret store, the lingerie chain’s first full store at sea.

Perhaps the greatest area of innovation on the Horizon has been in the food offerings, starting with Guy’s Pig & Anchor Smokehouse/Brewhouse, a name that requires some unpacking to understand.

The Guy is Guy Fieri, the TV chef who has created a burger concept for Carnival and also some complimentary BBQ pit stops on a few Carnival vessels. The Horizon is the first ship to have a proper barbecue restaurant, which accounts for the Smokehouse part of the name. It is open for free lunch on embarkation and sea days and at dinner with a la carte pricing each evening of the cruise.

The Brewhouse is a relocation of the brewery on the Vista from the RedFrog Pub into the BBQ restaurant. Carnival’s brewmaster has created four craft beers intended to complement the smoky food.

Another area where Carnival has combined venues is Fahrenheit 555, the steakhouse speciality restaurant that now has piano music at dinner. That was accomplished by relocating Piano Bar 88 from an area down the hall on the Vista to a space immediately adjacent to the steakhouse, where a private dining room sits on the Vista.

Bonsai Teppanyaki is Carnival's foray into a Japanese griddle restaurant. Photo Credit: Tom Stieghorst
Bonsai Teppanyaki is Carnival’s foray into a Japanese griddle restaurant. Photo Credit: Tom Stieghorst

A wall divider between the piano bar and the restaurant is opened during early evening when dinner begins.

“You have live piano music while you’re in the steakhouse,” Duffy said. “And then we close that off and go back to the piano bar after dinner.”

Another change in the steakhouse is dessert presentation, which is done with flair and brio at the table.

The Bonsai Sushi area has been expanded to incorporate Carnival’s first attempt at teppanyaki, the Japanese griddle restaurant with performing chefs who plate food with a circus-like theatricality

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Carnival announces the first ship based on US west coast in 20 years

Image result for carnival panorama ship

Carnival Cruise Line is to deploy a new ship on the US west coast for the first time in 20 years.

Carnival Panorama will be based in Long Beach, California, from December 2019.

The 3,960-passenger Carnival Panorama, the third Vista-class ship in the fleet, will run seven-day Mexican Riviera itineraries with bookings due to open next month.

New features unique to the new ship will be announced in the near future, according to the cruise line.

The planned deployment followed the company revamping its 146,000-square-foot Long Beach Cruise Terminal and plans for a multi-million dollar port development in Ensenada, Mexico with shops, restaurants and attractions.

The renovation of the terminal at Long Beach more than doubles the size while enhancing the overall passenger experience and operational flow.

It also includes the expansion of portside shore power to enable larger ships to plug into the local electric grid, reducing exhaust emissions while docked.

Carnival Cruise Line president Christine Duffy said: “This is a momentous occasion for both Carnival and the City of Long Beach – not only are we celebrating the grand re-opening of this magnificent cruise terminal, but also demonstrating our commitment to the west coast with the deployment of the spectacular new Carnival Panorama in 2019 and the announcement of an exciting new port development project in Ensenada.

“The west coast is an important market with vast growth potential and these initiatives further demonstrate the confidence in our future success in Long Beach.

“We are very much looking forward to having Carnival Panorama homeported here beginning next year.”

Carnival Horizon: the differing factors compared to Carnival Vista

<i>Carnival Horizon</i>: the differing factors compared to <i>Carnival Vista</i>
The welding of the box with a coin during the launching ceremony of Carnival HorizonFrom it’s hull shape and coating to the lifts, Carnival Horizon has been made as energy efficient as possible. Rebecca Moore spoke to its shipbuilder Fincantieri

The new cruise ship Carnival Horizon shares many of the same features as first-in-class Carnival Vista but it has two key elements that distinguish it from its sister.

Carnival Cruise Lines’ 133,500 gt Vista-class ship, which is being built by Fincantieri, is due for delivery in March this year. The focus on energy efficiency found in sister ship Carnival Vista – delivered in 2016 – has been even further boosted on Carnival Horizon.

An example is how the passenger lifts, manufactured by Schindler, are managed. This is a key distinguishing element from the first-in-class ship, as software is used to decrease energy consumption and increase the lifts’ efficiency. Not only is the system new to the Vista class, but it is the first time that it has been used on a ship.

This is significant, as Fincantieri project manager for the ship, Marco Lunardi, told Passenger Ship Technology. “We paid a lot of attention to the efficiency and environmental aspects of the lifts,” he said. “Passengers will spend less time waiting for the lift and the traffic is managed in a more efficient way to reduce the energy consumption of the lifts.”

This has been achieved by collecting destination information from passengers before they enter the lifts via a touch screen. This advance information is processed by software created especially for the lifts that combines all the passenger selection information and optimise lift availability according to the requests. Mr Lunardi said that this gave an average reduction of 30% waiting time at peak times.

The other main difference between Carnival Horizon and Carnival Vista relates to hull coatings – the former uses Hempel’s silicone hull coating, which uses a combination of hydrogel and silicone technology to combat fouling. A hydro gel microlayer prevents fouling organisms firmly adhering while the silicone polymers facilitate self-cleaning. This allows a longer period between drydock, Mr Lunardi said, because silicone paint can last more than five years.

Carnival Vista uses a “traditional” Hempel self-polishing antifouling tin-free coating. The principle on which the traditional self-polishing antifouling paint works is chemical, while the silicone one is mechanical, which means that it is a more environmentally friendly process.

A new hull

Apart from these aspects, Carnival Horizon shares technical innovations with Carnival Vista. One aspect that Mr Lunardi particularly drew attention to was the Vista-class hull. “It was very challenging to find the right hull lines,” he explained. The main reason for this was the hull had to optimised for two design points: its service speed of 18 knots and a maximum speed of 22.6 knots.

Mr Lunardi continued “This was really challenging in terms of testing and finding the right shape of the bulb and involved an external consultancy to help with knowledge.”

Extensive use of CFD calculations and in-tank model testing were deployed. “We fine-tuned the solution through several adjustments. We had to make sure that the hull lines met both service speed and maximum speed, so we needed to find the right compromise between different configurations.”

This led to a “different” and “new” hull shape compared to the rest of Carnival Cruise Lines’ fleet. In order to optimise it to meet the speed range, the bulb is more narrow than usual, compared with the usual cruise ship bulb.

An engine configuration was chosen to benefit the hull optimisation on Carnival Horizon. It consists of five MAN Diesel & Turbo engines, with two engines providing 16.8 MW of power each plus three smaller engines rated at 9.6 MW each. The two engines are type 14V48/60CR and the three are type 8L48/60CR. They are placed in the aft third of the vessel.

“They are the right size to manage the vessel in different conditions and can be used separately or in combination,” said Mr Lunardi, adding that this arrangement adds redundancy and allows the operator to meet safe return to port requirements.

Boosting energy efficiency

Energy efficiency is boosted by a steam turbine that recovers energy from the exhaust gas boilers, which would otherwise be lost. It is placed between the engines and generates 1.35 MW of power for use wherever needed, such as to boost hotel power. Fincantieri created and built the steam turbine, which has previously only been used on Vista-class ships within Carnival Cruise Lines’ fleet.

Propulsion is diesel-electric and ABB’s Azipod units are used, each absorbing 16.5 MW, bypassing the need for a propeller shaft. “They make it much easier to manoeuvre in bad weather and in windy conditions because using pods means that there is more efficient control,” Mr Lunardi said.

Another benefit is that there is more space inside the ship because the Azipods’ electric motors are not inside the ship.

Three scrubbers are used, with two for the two big engines and one allocated to one of the three smaller engines. They were developed by Ecospray Technologies and there were some challenges to overcome when it came to installing them, Mr Lunardi said. “The design of the scrubber was developed at the same time as the design of the vessel [and] the big challenge was to find a feasible coordination in a very narrow space,” he said.

“The technical solution was fine-tuned but there were a lot of adjustments and we created a dedicated team especially to work with Carnival on the scrubber.”

Particular attention was paid to the advanced wastewater treatment system (supplied by Scanship), which collects and treats grey and black water.

Fancoils and LED lighting are used throughout Carnival Horizon in order to save energy.

Like its sister ship, there is an emphasis on entertainment. To this end, features include an Imax 3D cinema and a brewery with onboard craft beer production. An impressive 63% of cabins are fitted with balconies.

Carnival Horizon particulars

Gross register: 133,500 gt

Length: 323 m

Moulded Breath: 37.20 m

Design draught: 8.25 m

Maximum air draught: 61.75 m

Passenger cabins: 1,987

Crew cabins: 761

Class society: Lloyd’s Register

 

Main equipment suppliers

Ship coatings

Hempel

Water fog system

Marioff

Lifeboats and technical boats

Hatecke

Catering

Oxin

Lifts and escalators

Schindler

Window washing system

Navalimpianti – Cofri

Public areas – carpet turnkey sub-contractor

DESSO

Public areas – stairs turnkey sub-contractor

Zago

Public areas – atrium and stores turnkey sub-contractor

IVM

Public areas – theatre, Lanai deck turnkey sub-contractor

Spencer Contract

Public areas – restaurants and spa turnkey sub-contractor

Molteni

Public areas – casinos turnkey sub-contractor

Marine Interiors

Public areas – IMAX cinema turnkey sub-contractor

Tino Sana

Cabins and corridors turnkey sub-contractor

Marine Interiors

Thrusters

Wärtsilä

Fin stabilisers

Fincantieri DSC

Main diesel engines

MAN Diesel & Turbo

Emergency generator engine

Compagnia Generale Trattori (Caterpillar)

Reverse osmosis desalinator

Case Marine

Propulsion system pod

ABB

Storage batteries technical specification

Enersys

Ship digital communication network

Tyco

Automation system and TLV

Wärtsilä A.P.S.S.

Radio systems

Telemar (equipment Sailor)

Navigation systems

Wärtsilä A.P.S.S.

Snapshot CV Marco Lunardi

Fincantieri Merchant Ships Business Unit vice president project manager Marco Lunardi is currently managing the construction of Carnival Horizon and Carnival Panorama that are currently being built in Marghera shipyard.

As the project manager, he also worked on the construction and delivery of Carnival Vista, flagship of Carnival Cruise Line, which was built in Monfalcone shipyard. Previously he has worked on Carnival Breeze and on Le Boreal and L’Austral, luxury ships for Ponant, a French cruise ship operator.

He joined Fincantieri in 2000 and, previous to being appointed project manager, he worked as the planner and financial controller and deputy project manager for the building of Carnival Group ships.

Mr Lunardi holds a degree in management engineering from the University of Padova, Italy.